Biomarkers

Creatinine (Urine) – DUTCH — Interpretation of DUTCH test (Dried Urine Test) from Precision Analytics (PART 4)

In this category of the DUTCH test you can see your Creatinine values of all four samples taken. 

creatinine waking morning afternoon night precision analytics dried urine

– Creatinine is measured to correct results for urine dilution. 

Creatinine values fluctuate with hydration levels. 

What is creatinine correction, and does it produce valid results?

As a urine sample gets more diluted (=thinner/weaker), the concentration of the hormone decreases. The creatinine value decreases in parallel and corrects for hydration.

Because creatinine is excreted in a predictable way, this has been used by labs for many years with respect to many different urinary laboratory tests. The Dutch test is based on the assumption that a 24-hour collection is the gold standard for urine hormone testing. A 24-hour collection can be difficult to complete correctly as it is challenging for the patient. If a 24-hour collection is done correctly, DUTCH values compare favorably. This correlation data is critical in concluding that creatinine correction, as used in the DUTCH test, is effective for producing results reasonably equivalent to 24- hour urine values.

– If a patient has abnormal creatinine clearance, it could affect the results.

– 24-hour urine tests are dependent on people collecting their samples correctly and measuring the total volume accurately.

Additional note: Any urine test (DUTCH or 24-hour) should not be used for free cortisol assessment if the patient is known to have an abnormal glomerular filtration rate (cortisol may be artificially low in cases with low GFR).

Creatinine A (Waking)

Optimal range: 0.2 – 2 mg/ml

Creatinine values are measured to correct results for urine dilution.

Creatinine is a waste product produced by muscles from the breakdown of a compound called creatine. Creatinine is filtered from the blood by the kidneys and released into the urine.

The amount of creatinine produced in the body is dependent on muscle mass and is relatively constant for an individual. The amount of creatinine removed from the blood depends on both the filtering ability of the kidneys and the rate at which blood is carried to the kidneys.

LEARN MORE

Creatinine B (Morning)

Optimal range: 0.2 – 2 mg/ml

Creatinine values are measured to correct results for urine dilution.

Creatinine is a waste product produced by muscles from the breakdown of a compound called creatine. Creatinine is filtered from the blood by the kidneys and released into the urine.

The amount of creatinine produced in the body is dependent on muscle mass and is relatively constant for an individual. The amount of creatinine removed from the blood depends on both the filtering ability of the kidneys and the rate at which blood is carried to the kidneys.

LEARN MORE

Creatinine C (Afternoon)

Optimal range: 0.2 – 2 mg/ml

Creatinine values are measured to correct results for urine dilution.

Creatinine is a waste product produced by muscles from the breakdown of a compound called creatine. Creatinine is filtered from the blood by the kidneys and released into the urine.

The amount of creatinine produced in the body is dependent on muscle mass and is relatively constant for an individual. The amount of creatinine removed from the blood depends on both the filtering ability of the kidneys and the rate at which blood is carried to the kidneys.

LEARN MORE

Creatinine D (Night)

Optimal range: 0.2 – 2 mg/ml

Creatinine values are measured to correct results for urine dilution.

Creatinine is a waste product produced by muscles from the breakdown of a compound called creatine. Creatinine is filtered from the blood by the kidneys and released into the urine.

The amount of creatinine produced in the body is dependent on muscle mass and is relatively constant for an individual. The amount of creatinine removed from the blood depends on both the filtering ability of the kidneys and the rate at which blood is carried to the kidneys.

LEARN MORE

Disclaimer:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you. 

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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