Biomarkers

What is red blood cell Magnesium?

Measuring mineral concentrations inside your erythrocytes (red blood cells) is one of the best ways to determine their adequacy. Minerals are important catalysts that spark many of the chemical reactions in your body

The most extensively required mineral element in your body is magnesium. Erythrocyte magnesium is a measure of magnesium adequacy.

Magnesium is a critical element because hundreds of enzymatic reactions in the body depend on it. Muscles need magnesium for the process of contraction and relaxation. The heart needs this element to have a steady beat. The immune system needs it to eliminate inflammation. The blood vessels need magnesium so they can adequately expand and contract, thus controlling blood pressure.

Magnesium is just as important as zinc and chromium for proper blood sugar regulation. It makes insulin work better in the body. New research reports state that even the process of energy production (getting energy from fats and carbohydrates) and the synthesis of proteins are dependent on magnesium.

The most accurate way to know what the level of magnesium is inside the cells is with the red blood cell (RBC) magnesium lab test. You could have low RBC magnesium levels but your serum magnesium levels will show high levels.

Dietary sources of magnesium include dark green leafy vegetables, lentils, beans, grains (unprocessed), and nuts.

red blood cells magnesium

High levels indicate:

  • Kidney failure
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Dehydration
  • Diabetic acidosis (when first detected)
  • Addison’s disease
  • Use of magnesium-containing antacids or laxatives

Low levels indicate:

  • Malabsorption
  • Malnutrition or low dietary intake
  • Prolonged diarrhea
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Hypoparathyroidism
  • Long-term diuretic use
  • Post surgery
  • Severe burns
  • Toxemia or pregnancy

Resources:

Disclaimer:

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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