Biomarkers

What is the Methylation Balance Ratio? High and low values | Lab results explained

The Methylation Balance Ratio compares four methylated metabolites (including SAM) to four un-methylated metabolites (including SAH). Therefore, the Methylation Balance Ratio can be thought of as an expanded SAM/ SAH ratio.

The four methyl group donors that make up the numerator of the equation are:

– SAM,

– methionine,

– betaine,

– and serine.

The four un-methylated metabolites are:

– SAH,

– homocysteine,

– DMG,

– and sarcosine.

The clinical utility of the Methylation Balance Ratio is that it represents a potential way to detect methylation imbalance prior to alterations in the SAM/SAH ratio. The SAM/SAH ratio is resistant to fluctuations due to multiple feedback mechanisms and backup pathways. Therefore, measuring the metabolites of these backup pathways may provide earlier insight into subtle fluctuations in methylation balance. This approach is still novel and is based solely on biochemical pathway analysis. However, early Genova data analysis of this biomarker has demonstrated its ability to distinguish a healthy cohort from an unqualified cohort.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR METHYLATION BALANCE RATIO RESULT IS TOO LOW?

More Unmethylated Metabolites:

Check SAH and Homocysteine Levels: 

If elevated, consider nutritional methylation support:
– Vitamins B12
– Vitamin B6
– Folate
– Zinc
– Other methylation support may be considered as well, especially with low levels of betaine and choline.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR METHYLATION BALANCE RATIO RESULT IS TOO HIGH?

More Methylation Group Donors:

– Potential Over-methylation: Review genetic markers, such as BHMT, that could lead to higher SAM levels. Review nutritional supplements that could be contributing to high SAM, methionine, betaine or serine
– High Protein Intake

Disclaimer:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you. 

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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