Biomarkers

What is Fecal Eosinophil Protein X? High and low values | Lab results explained

Eosinophil Protein X (EPX) is a water-soluble protein that is found in eosinophils.

EPX levels in stool are a marker of eosinophil activity in the gastrointestinal system. Fecal EPX abnormality is suggestive of food allergy, eosinophil-driven inflammation (caused by parasites). The test has been shown to have higher specificity and positive predictive value for detecting disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease compared to fecal calprotectin.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR FECAL EOSINOPHIL PROTEIN X RESULT IS TOO LOW?

Eosinophil Protein X levels cannot be too low. A reading of zero would be considered normal.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR FECAL EOSINOPHIL PROTEIN X RESULT IS TOO HIGH?

Elevated levels associated with inflammation and tissue damage likely due to parasitic infections, IBD or food allergies.

Consider testing for food allergies and treatment based on root cause analysis.

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Abnormally high levels of Eosinophil Protein X in stool samples indicate inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, the test may indicate inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. However, other processes can increase eosinophil activity in the bowels. For example chronic diarrhea, chronic gastroesophageal reflux, and chronic alcohol misuse can cause an irritation of the lining of the gut, which increases eosinophil activity and Eosinophil Protein X levels.

Some specific causes of high Eosinophil Protein X levels are:

– Crohn’s disease

– Ulcerative colitis

– Intestinal parasites (e.g. helminths)

– Chronic diarrhea

– Chronic gastroesophageal reflux

– Chronic alcohol misuse

– Protein-sensitive enteropathy

– Colon cancer

– Eosinophilic gastroenteritis

Disclaimer:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you. 

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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