Biomarkers

What is Eubacterium rectale? High and low values | Lab results explained

Eubacterium rectale (E. rectale), which accounts for up to 13% of the gut microbiota in total feces in the human colon and thus, is one of the most prevalent bacterial species, is a major contributor to the production of butyrate. People with Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ulcerative colitis have significantly reduced amounts of Eubacterium rectale, and these people have lower butyrate concentrations in their feces than healthy individuals.

References:

Rivière A, Selak M, Lantin D, Leroy F, De Vuyst L. Bifidobacteria and Butyrate-Producing Colon Bacteria: Importance and Strategies for Their Stimulation in the Human Gut. Front Microbiol (2016) 7:979. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2016.00979

Gevers D, Kugathasan S, Denson LA, Vázquez-Baeza Y, Van Treuren W, Ren B, et al. The Treatment-Naive Microbiome in New-Onset Crohn’s Disease. Cell Host Microbe (2014) 15(3):382–92. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2014.02.005

Takahashi K, Nishida A, Fujimoto T, Fujii M, Shioya M, Imaeda H, et al. Reduced Abundance of Butyrate-Producing Bacteria Species in the Fecal Microbial Community in Crohn’s Disease. Digestion (2016) 93(1):59–65. doi: 10.1159/000441768

Vaahtovuo J, Munukka E, Korkeamäki M, Luukkainen R, Toivanen P. Fecal Microbiota in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis. J Rheumatol (2008) 35(8):1500–5.

Vermeiren J, Van den Abbeele P, Laukens D, Vigsnaes LK, De Vos M, Boon N, et al. Decreased Colonization of Fecal Clostridium Coccoides/Eubacterium Rectale Species From Ulcerative Colitis Patients in an In Vitro Dynamic Gut Model With Mucin Environment. FEMS Microbiol Ecol (2012) 79(3):685–96. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01252.x

What does it mean if your Eubacterium rectale result is too low?

People with Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ulcerative colitis have significantly reduced amounts of Eubacterium rectale, and these people have lower butyrate concentrations in their feces than healthy individuals.

Disclaimer:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you. 

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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