Biomarkers

What is a-Hydroxybutyric Acid? High and low values | Lab results explained

a-hydroxybutyric acid (2-hydroxybuturic acid [2-HB]) is a marker that relates to oxidative stress.

a-hydroxybutyric acid is an organic acid produced from a-ketobutyrate via the enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) or a-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH).

These enzymes are catalyzed by NADH. Oxidative stress creates an imbalance in NADH/NAD ratios, which leads directly to the production of a-hydroxybutyric acid. Being that a-hydroxybutyric acid’s precursor a-ketobutyrate is a byproduct in the glutathione (GSH) synthesis pathway, an increased demand for GSH may ultimately result in increased a-hydroxybutyric acid.

Increased oxidative stress associated with insulin resistance increases the rate of hepatic glutathione synthesis. Plasma a-hydroxybutyric acid is highly associated with insulin resistance and may be an effective biomarker for prediabetes.

A study on type 2 diabetics showed that GSH infusion restored the NADH/NAD balance and resulted in improvement of insulin sensitivity and beta cell function.

References:

– https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5565252/

– https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20526369/

– https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1737525/

– https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/168632/

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR A-HYDROXYBUTYRIC ACID RESULT IS TOO LOW?

There are no known clinical associations with low levels of a-hydroxybutyric acid.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR A-HYDROXYBUTYRIC ACID RESULT IS TOO HIGH?

Higher circulating levels of a-Hydroxybutyric Acid are associated with insulin resistance and prediabetes.

Elevated a-hydroxybutyric acid may be seen with oxidative stress.

Treatment options:

Evaluate oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and ensure adequate antioxidant intake and glutathione status. Hard physical exercise can result in lactic acidosis and accumulation of 2-HB.

Disclaimer:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you. 

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: