Biomarkers

What is Ceruloplasmin?

What is Ceruloplasmin?

Ceruloplasmin.jpg

Ceruloplasmin is a copper-containing enzyme that plays a role in the body’s iron metabolism. This test measures the amount of ceruloplasmin in the blood.

Function of copper:

Copper is an essential mineral that plays a role in the regulation of iron metabolism, formation of connective tissue, energy production at the cellular level, and the function of the nervous system. It is absorbed from food and liquids by the intestines and then transported to the liver, where it is stored or used to produce a variety of enzymes.

The liver binds copper to a protein to produce ceruloplasmin and then releases it into the bloodstream. About 95% of the copper in the blood is bound to ceruloplasmin. Because of this, the ceruloplasmin test can be used along with one or more copper tests to help diagnose Wilson disease, an inherited disorder that can lead to excess storage of copper in the liver, brain, and other organs.

When To Get Tested?

When you have jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, behavioral changes, tremors, or other symptoms that a health practitioner thinks may be due to Wilson disease or, rarely, to copper deficiency; at intervals when monitoring is recommended.

Test results:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you.

The normal range for a ceruloplasmin serum test is 19 to 39 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

References:

  • Diagnostic Value of Ceruloplasmin in the Diagnosis of Pediatric Wilson’s Disease, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4600703/
  • Ceruloplasmin and iron in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease: a synopsis of recent studies, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3493298/

Disclaimer:

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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