Biomarkers

What is Alanine?

Alanine is a non-essential amino acid and helps the body convert the simple sugar glucose into energy and eliminate excess toxins from the liver.

Of the 20 amino acids in the proteins of your body, we can make alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, proline, serine and tyrosine but not histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan or valine.

Low levels:

Low Alanine levels may point to hypoglycemic conditions because of its role in gluconeogenesis. Supplement with alanine and the branched chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine.

High levels:

High Alanine levels may possibly point to inadequate cellular energy substrates. Check for hypoglycemia or for exercise prior to blood draw. Chronic use of alanine for energy can lead to muscle wasting. Supplement the branched-chain amino acids.

Disclaimer:

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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