Biomarkers

What is Choline? High and low values | Lab results explained

Choline is used for:

– Epigeneticgeneregulation

– Precursortolipoproteins

– Phospholipids

– Acetylcholine

Choline is an essential dietary nutrient found in many foods. Here are some of the sources:

– vegetables, including broccoli, potatoes, and mushrooms
– whole grains, such as quinoa, rice, and whole wheat bread
– nuts and seeds
– proteins, such as beef, soybeans, fish, poultry, and eggs

Choline can be made endogenously, but dietary intake is needed to prevent deficiency. Choline is a critical cell membrane component. It also helps to ensure the structural integrity and signaling functions within the cell. Choline is a precursor for the important neurotransmitter acetylcholine and the membrane phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin.

In the methylation cycle, choline is oxidized to form betaine, which can then be used as a methyl donor. Because choline and betaine are involved in the re-methylation of homocysteine back to methionine, they form a backup-pathway that is particularly favored in folate deficiency.

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References:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18716669/
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20446114/

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR CHOLINE RESULT IS TOO LOW?

– Low intake
– Malabsorption / maldigestion

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR CHOLINE RESULT IS TOO HIGH?

– Too much dietary intake (i.e. meat, eggs, soybeans, and wheat germ, etc)
– Upregulation of the betaine/choline backup pathway

Elevated choline levels are associated with key components of metabolic syndrome (dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, and BMI). Betaine showed an opposite relationship. This may suggest a disruption of mitochondrial choline oxidation to betaine as part of the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in metabolic syndrome.

Choline is a major lipotrophe, responsible for creating VLDL. Elevated plasma choline is positively associated with:

– Triglycerides

– Glucose

– BMI

– Body fat

– Waist circumference

Disclaimer:

Test results may vary depending on your age, gender, health history, the method used for the test, and other things. Your test results may not mean you have a problem. Ask your healthcare provider what your test results mean for you. 

The information on healthmatters.io is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

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